The MS Diet Study: A Radical Idea

I value this study of the effect of diet on MS, not the least because it is radical. It isn’t often a rigorous clinical trial is run in which the end goal is not a marketable commodity in the form of a drug.

The end goal of this trial is patient health. It’s not about profits. There’s no cookbook cabal conspiring to profit from the chronically ill. Sure, a few thousand farmers markets may see a rise in sales of organic produce. No harm there. The fish oil industry may get a bump. But overall, no single party involved in the outcome stands to gain as much as wealth as Big Pharma does every time they release a new medication they can sell to captive consumers for as much as $7000 per month.

And yet: if you are to follow this link to the logical, researched TED Talk by the inventor of the Wahls diet, you will encounter a red warning label superimposed over the opening frame:

“Note from TED: This talk, which features health advice based on a personal narrative, has been flagged as potentially outside TED’s curatorial guidelines. Viewer discretion advised.”

And if you follow this link to learn more about the Swank Diet, Wikipedia will inform you, “The widespread claims made for the diet have not been substantiated by independent medical research.”

The good news: this MS Society sponsored clinical trial is being administered by the University of Iowa, and should finally provide the objective substantiation all people with MS deserve.

And while Big Pharma might not have much to gain financially from the results of this study, that doesn’t mean this study, if successful, won’t have a mighty economic impact. If we trial participants regain our health by merely adjusting our diets; if we leave our walkers and our reclining wheelchairs and our social security checks and go back to full time work, to do whatever it was we were schooled in, and trained for, if we can once again have the freedom to follow our dreams—we will be more effective than any worker who has had the luxury of taking health for granted. And if those $7,000/mo drugs are no longer needed, that will go a long way to correcting our nation’s disgracefully costly health care system.

Follow this link to Dr. Wahl’s rebuttal of the TED Talk warning.

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