Monthly Archives: May 2017

Today I’m a Guest Blogger at Solstice Literary Magazine

Solstice, a magazine of diverse voices, added my voice to its choir today. This lovely venue gave my essay a sweet write-up. Follow this link to read my essay about race and disability and love.

Today I got some good news and some bad news. The good news came from my retina specialist, who regards the opinions of the last two doctors I’d spoken with as “outdated” and assures me I can continue to practice yoga and even do inversions without increasing the risk of dislodging my retinas. The bad news came when I arrived, pupils still dilated, for my writing workshop at a senior living facility. I learned that one of the writers had died while I was in Costa Rica. She had died suddenly but died well, in the midst of a bridge game with her lifelong friends. Had our departed author learned in advance the circumstances of her own ending, I think she would have been mostly pleased, but she would have wanted to have finished the novel she’d been working on. Her characters, who had seemed so alive, are  in a kind of purgatory at the moment. I’ve given my workshop the assignment of imagining fit endings for her characters. We will finish her book with our own versions, in our own minds, in her honor.

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Full Speed Ahead on MS Diet

After twelve weeks of anticipation, I finally learned which MS Diet I would be assigned for the duration of the study.

And the winner is…

confidential, at least until I complete the remaining six months of the trial.

I agreed to this stipulation, just as I agreed to injesting certain supplements, to saying yes to certain foods, to saying no to others. A clinical study is a group endeavor. Like any group endeavor, it comes with the perk of getting group support. Observe the above photo, in which I effortlessly glide above the lush tree canopy of the Arenal Volcano. Am I alone in this picture? Only because of how it is framed. A tico named Aaron suited me up, belted me in, and sent me on my way. A tico named Pépé was waiting for me on the other side. And a whole bunch of brave souls I never did meet set this whole contraption up in the first place with some fishing line and moxie.

My husband went ahead of me on the zip line. Unbeknownst to him,  I took some comfort in lighly touching the vibrating line as I watched him glide to the other side. I take no small comfort in having my husband accompany me on this MS adventure. I am grateful, too, for the many friends who have shown support and interest, and to my family of origin, who are all set to eat according to the diet when I fly in to visit them on Sunday. I do not take this challenge on alone.

About to Launch

I am about to complete the Phase One, the Usual Diet phase, of the MS Diet study, which compares the efficacy of the Swank Diet with the Wahls Protocol in improving fatigue for people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

My husband and I concluded the Usual Diet Phase by going somewhere unusual. We’d never been to Costa Rica before. We wanted to eat our way through a new country without making any gringo requests for “gluten-free” anything. As it turned out, we ate very healthily there, and could have followed either diet without causing a stir. At one of the bed and breakfasts where we stayed, breakfast consisted of a neighbor’s eggs, seasoned with herbs growing in the kitchen garden, accompanied by juice squeezed fresh from oranges I’d picked myself in the backyard. And the coffee was picked right there in town. Food can’t get more local than that.  Yum! Costa Rica is a much healthier nation than the USA. (More on that in a later post.)

Tomorrow morning, my husband and I will take the seven hour road trip to Iowa City, IA, the site of the Diet Study.  This town has some sentimental value to us; it was here that I went to grad school, here where our only child was born. The hospital hold memories, too. It was here where I worked for the Telemedicine Resource Center, here where I had my first MRI, first lumar puncture, first spinal headache (when the puncture went wrong.) Here was where I got the diagnosis, twenty two years ago, that made me think I’d have less than ten years left outside a wheelchair. I’m still walking. But more slowly than I’d like.

On Wednesday, after my fasting blood is drawn, my food records are handed over, and my motor assessments are taken, my husband and I will meet with the study nutritionist, who will announce which diet we will be expected to adhere to for the next twenty four months. My hope, of course, is that whichever diet we get will reverse my disease course, that this will not be a mere twenty four month change, but the beginning of a lifetime shift. Are my hopes too high? My husband thinks so. He thinks we eat pretty darn healthy already. But he’s open to giving either diet a chance. I am so grateful for that.

The Swank Diet is a low saturated fat diet that eliminates red meat and high fat foods and includes whole grains and fat free dairy products. The Wahls Elimination Diet eliminates all grains, dairy, legumes, eggs, and nightshade vegetables/spices. Both diets include fruits and vegetables and dietary supplements.

Wish us luck!