An Open Fan Letter to Roxane Gay

Since hearing an interview with Roxane Gay on Fresh Air, I have been obsessed with watching or listening to every interview with her that I can find. Her point of view is refreshing and relaxing because she’s not trying to be an example to anyone. She’s just trying to be herself in a body that many in society dismiss at a glance. As a person in a disabled body, I can relate. Nobody cares about disabled people. That point was driven home just yesterday, when Capitol police dragged protesters out of their wheelchairs to jai.

Roxane Gay is a model to me, because she does a better job than I do of giving an honest portrayal of what it is like to live in a body that is not sanctioned by society. As she said to  Trevor Noah,  “I wanted to tell the story of my body, because when you’re fat in the world, people have assumptions….I think it is important to show what it is like to live in this world in a fat body.”

When I replace the word “fat” with the word “disabled’ I see we have the same goal. I am further from my goal than she is from hers. Her achievement shines light on where I need to go.

I am always trying to make my site accessible to people who can’t imagine what it’s like to have MS. I want to be that example of a person trying her hardest every day to overcome. But I’m afraid that in my quest to be a create a palatable persona, I might be neglecting the complexities of living with MS, a debilitating illness that has no cure.

For instance, I was very eager to post the image of myself zip-lining down a volcano in Costa Rica. That moment was a dream come true for me. I’m a person who has a hard time walking. Why wouldn’t I want to fly?

I felt chastened, though, when I came home and someone told me, “I have to show that picture to my son with MS. He would never zipline!”

I hate the idea of my blog existing as a rebuke to people with MS who don’t have the financial resources or the supportive spouse that make my adventures possible. I know what team I’m on. I also know what team would never choose me. (I’m looking at you, Mitch McConnell.)

I’ve been thinking about the images I share on this blog, and on Twitter. My profile picture on Twitter is of me in mid-jump. You might think from this image that I’m a super-athlete. In a way, I am. But that’s just because moving anywhere near normally is a lot harder for me than it is for the able-bodied. My legs can feel very heavy to me, because I can’t control them terribly well. If you’ve ever had to move a full-grown human being whose body is not attached to your central nervous system, you might get the idea. I can be dead weight to myself. So yeah, I often do feel a great deal of accomplishment by merely crossing a room. The closer I get to appearing to move normally, the more I feel I’ve gotten away with something. But this is what I fear: by aping normalcy, I am rejecting the very people whose daily experience I actually share.  Today I am posting a picture of myself not flying, not jumping, but squatting, as I take a break during a jungle hike. You will notice I used walking poles. I myself want more images of people using walking poles out here in cyber-space, so that people like me, who need them, can feel more comfortable about using them to go a little further in this world.

I am very eager to read all of Roxane Gay’s books. I am also eager to try harder to be true to my own experience, which isn’t all transcendence. Let me know when I fall short.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “An Open Fan Letter to Roxane Gay

  1. Another honest and insightful post, Lisa. How complex it is for you to navigate this world, trying so hard to appear “normal” and yet feeling as though you’re “cheating” by “hiding” your pain, frustration, and all the effort and bravery it takes to go through daily life. So “super athlete”, knowing what effort it takes you to live every day makes me breathe a prayer of thanksgiving for every day that I enjoy good health.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s