Tag Archives: choosing MS medications

What’s Wrong With This Picture?

Bad Decision

Yesterday my friend Monica and I went kayaking on the Miami River. When you read, “kayaking,” you might get the impression we were paddling madly. We were not. We were just two women of a certain age, bobbing along on a still lake, dipping our paddles occasionally as we chatted.

Monica and I met at a yoga class for people with MS. We’ve both had MS symptoms for decades. We share the same neurologist, Dr. Z. MS gives us a lot to talk about. I told Monica how much I admired her decision to stay away from MS medications, despite Dr. Z’s recommendation to start one. I think she’s been managing her disease really well. Monica runs her own business. She can hike for miles. She can drive without hand controls. She can put on a sneaker while standing on one foot. If I could do those things, I’d consider myself pretty well cured.

Monica told me she admires me for being brave enough to try experimental medications. I assured her I haven’t been brave, only desperate.

I would be oversimplifying to present us as taking opposite tacks. If you were to draw a Venn diagram of our approaches to MS, you’d find a pretty big overlap in the center. We both do yoga. We both experiment with controlling MS through diet; me in a clinical trial, and Monica in the privacy of her own kitchen. We are both total strivers, still hoping to get healthier, not sicker, as though we weren’t aware we have a degenerative disease. What’s our secret? Delusion, we agreed, laughing. Every day, we push forward, not necessarily ignoring the bad stuff, but not letting that stuff define us either.

When I observed that we’d been under the sun for a while, we paddled over to a shady spot, being the proactive types who wouldn’t ignore the sun and overheat, thereby triggering our MS symptoms.

Monica took a picture of me in my rented kayak, wisely sheltering beneath an overhanging tree. I’d made a good decision, right? Nope. I’d made a bad decision. This morning I’d woken up itching.  Turns out, I’d been nestled in poison oak. I’m not saying I would have been better off heating up in the middle of the lake. But maybe I should have chosen to not shelter quite so deeply in the shade.

Here’s the thing about living with MS in these times: there are many treatment options to choose from, including the option to not medicate. Smart, conscientious people can labor over these options for days, or even years, yet make a choice with grim consequences. When I was a little kid, I used to think I’d eventually recognize the bad option when I saw one. Boy, did I underestimate the complications of this world.