Wahls Elimination Diet vs Swank Diet: Which Is the More Effective Treatment for MS Related Fatigue? Ms. Lab Rat jumps into the maze.

Some Background (faithful readers can skip to paragraph 5):

As my faithful readers know, I am a machine with faulty wiring. Multiple Sclerosis has somehow managed to convince my T-cells to attack the insulation that surrounds the nerves conducting all the information my body needs to function optimally. This insulation is called myelin, and my myelin is ratty with scars. (Multiple sclerosis=many scars.)

When I got the diagnosis, I refused to accept my fate. I tried the first medication I was offered. And when that didn’t work, I tried a second. And when that didn’t work, I entered a clinical study of a new medication, one, I was told, that really made a difference. But as will happen 50% of the time with clinical studies, it turned out I was assigned to the control group. I didn’t get the new medication. I got a placebo. And I got more scars.

I not only tried new medications, I tried new doctors. (I moved around a lot, at first, so that part could not be helped.) When my fourth neurologist gave me the dour news that I was doing very badly, and could expect to do worse, and then much worse until I died, well, I switched to a cheerier doctor. Who gave me the same dire news, but with a big smile. I dumped her, too. Instead I found a brilliant researcher, Bibiana Bielekova. Researchers are always looking for better ways to do things. So am I.

Long story short, I talked Dr. Bielekova into letting me try an off-label drug that worked with the immune system, rather than fight it. Daclizumab works by boosting the population of Natural Killer Cells, which function like the good cops in the Wild West of my immune system; the Natural Killer Cells keep the rouge T-Cells, or bad cops, at bay. Daclizumab worked. The T-Cells stopped attacking my myelin. Eventually, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded a study of Daclizumab. I was lucky enough to join the safety arm of the study, so I was assured a constant supply of Daclizumab. In the last ten years, this medication has been so effective, the T-cells have only once managed to create a new scar. Earlier this year, the FDA apporved Daclizumab under the name Zinbryta. On the day I injected my last dose of free study medication, I was accepted into a new clinical trial.

Faithful readers, jump in here:

Finding a drug that stabilized my MS only solved half of my problem. While my T-cells have stopped chewing on the fatty myelin that insulates my nerves, the many scars created by years of insatiable gobbling still interrupt the signals of my central nervous system. I have to cope with fatigue, pain, lack of coordination and balance, and a digestive system that’s out to lunch. Oh yes, and a brain that continues to shrink. You would think, then, that a person as proactive as I am would have immediately acted when I saw a very convincing TED Talk by a smart researcher who overcame an even worse case of MS than mine. Like me, Dr. Terry Wahls took the latest greatest MS medication. And like me, her MS only got worse. Dr. Wahls soon found herself confined to a tilt-recline wheelchair. Unlike me, Dr. Wahls is a physician. She read the latest medical research about diseases in which brains shrink. She read studies in which animal brains had been protected from shrinkage using fish oil, creatine, and co-enzyme Q-10. She started taking human proportioned dosages of these substances, and started getting better. This was her first round of self-experimentation. Slowly but surely, she tweaked her diet to include and exclude certain nutrients and ultimately found herself out of the wheelchair, biking to a full day of work as a doctor, and, of course, promoting the diet that saved her. She managed to get the Multiple Sclerosis Society to chip in 1 million dollars to fund a scientific study to compare her diet with the Swank Diet, one that has been  found to help people with MS for decades. I, who was somehow too intimidated years ago to follow the Wahls Protocol, have now agreed to be part of this study, which is going to be a much more onerous and complicated option than simply buying her book and following along. How much more onerous and complicated? I’ll share the details in my next post. But strange as it is, a Lab Rat is a Lab Rat. I would rather experiment on my diet in a study as a contribution to the greater public knowledge than to simply tinker with the diet on my own.

How about you? Have you ever participated in a clincial trial? Would you?

 

 

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Once A Lab Rat, Always a Lab Rat

The NIH study that has nurtured me since 2010 is over. The day I’ve been anticipating with measured trepidation has finally arrived. A few hours ago, I took the last of the vials of free medication from the NIH out of my refrigerator, and injected.

If the drug had not passed the FDA approval process, this would have been a very sad day. But it did pass. The fruition of the study is available commercially as Zinbryta. Dr. Z., my neurologist, has already set in motion a smooth transition for me; I’ll be the first of his MS patients to purchase Zinbryta. I won’t have to miss a dose of the drug that has given me my life back.

So today, then, marks the happy ending to my life as a Lab Rat?

Not so fast.

Today marks the closing of one chapter. And the opening of another.

This morning I received a phone call from a research assistant named Brianna. She asked me ten easy questions designed to provoke pleasant answers, such as, “Today is Tuesday, September 15, 2016” and, “Barack Obama is the President of the United States.” At the end of this quiz, I found myself qualified to be a Lab Rat in the MS Diet Study.

As any faithful reader of this blog knows, I am very interested in the role of diet in the management of MS. I’ve been intrigued by the Wahls Diet since seeing Dr. Wahl’s TED talk; I couldn’t help but be impressed that she has managed to eat her way out of a reclining wheelchair and back to full time medical practice.

This study will randomly assign me to either the Wahls Diet or the Swank Diet. As it happens, I am comfortable with both. Dr. Z. has met many people with MS leading active, healthy lives on the Swank diet. It will be a win for me either way.

I don’t have to ditch Zinbryta to participate.

Could a lab rat be any luckier?

Another fun perk of this study: I will be traveling to Iowa City, home of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, where I got my MFA in fiction, and, come to think of it, my MS diagnosis. This Lab Rat will be traveling full circle.

I do hope you will follow Ms. Lab Rat to my next maze in Iowa City. I won’t be able to blog about which MS Diet I am assigned to, because the researchers must be blind.

I am so very grateful, above all, to my husband, who likes our current diet very much, but is willing to give an MS diet a try.

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Six Months

Note from the Rat: Reading over this 2012 blog post from my vantage point in 2016, I am so grateful to the NIH (National Institutes of Health), which has continued to supply me with the MS medication I have depended on to keep my Multiple Sclerosis in remission. This medication, which I refer to as  DAC HYP, will (hopefully) go to market with the name Zinbryta. In these intervening years since I wrote this post, all that was asked of me was that I have my liver functions checked locally every six months, and that I fly down to the NIH every six months to have more extensive testing; more bloodwork, a lumbar puncture, eye exams, typical neurologic exams, MRI’s. The length of time it is taking to get the drug approved has been very frustrating to me, as I know more and more people who have been diagnosed with MS who have no access to the medication that has worked so well for me (one brain lesion in ten years, vs many tens of lesions in the ten years previous.) My very dearest friend with MS, Debra C.,  died while waiting for access to this drug. The only comfort I can take from this long wait is that I, and the privileged few on the safety arm of this study, have accumulated more living proof that one can take this drug for years and years and years with no major side effects.  So here it is, my blog post from 2012:

 

I’ve got 6 months left on the NIH (National Institutes of Health) trial of DAC HYP. After that, I might not get further access to the drug that has kept the progress of my multiple sclerosis (MS) in check for the past 6 years.
I didn’t panic when I was told the money just wasn’t there to keep the trial participants on the drug. I probably should have. As my sister reminded me, “You think you’re doing OK, but that’s not you doing OK, that’s you on the drug.”
She’s right.
I know, because I get monthly reminders of me-off-the-drug. I can only inject DAC HYP once a month, but the effect usually seems to last only three weeks: the week preceding a fresh injection is a drag. Literally. I pretty much just drag my body around, propping it up until my next dose of DAC HYP, when the “real me” can take over again.
What will I do when there is no next injection?
I may be left dragging around a husk of myself until such time as the FDA approves the commercial release of DAC HYP. That process may take as long as two years.
How much damage can multiple sclerosis do in two years?
I can’t afford to find out. My central nervous system has undergone punishing damage already, from the many years I was on no drugs, followed by the many years I was on bad drugs.
Everyone I tell about the upcoming DAC HYP discontinuation has urged me to take another drug in its place. If I had thought there was a more effective drug out there, I wouldn’t be taking a trial drug, would I?
I’ve had plenty of disappointments with other MS drugs.
Some new ones have come out since I started my trial, and maybe those drugs will prove effective. Or maybe they’ll prove lethal. People have died on MS drugs. At times, my MS symptoms have been bad enough to make me indifferent to such a risk. The “real me”, the one on DAC HYP, doesn’t feel that desperate. We’ll see what happens when access to the “real me” runs out.
Somehow I’ve never envisioned a life after DAC HYP that would include sampling yet another MS medication. I’ve been hoping, I still hope, that I would live to switch out DAC HYP for the actual cure.
You see, I don’t want to medicate my MS. I want to vanquish it.
I’m not the only one. There is talk of an MS “cure.” It’s somewhat hyperbolic, but it’s also compelling. Dr. Wahls, a neurologist in Iowa City, used to suffer from a particularly aggressive form of MS that was rapidly debilitating and drove her into a reclining wheelchair. She fought back by eating every “brain food” she could think of, and by exercising as much as was physically possible. I wouldn’t say she is “cured” now, because I bet her lesions didn’t disappear, but she is certainly doing very well. She can stand for the duration of a TED talk. She is also biking to work, she is practicing medicine full-time, and she is starting a clinical trial to examine the effect of diet on MS. It could be, as she claims, that she has reversed a case of progressive multiple sclerosis. I hope so. Or it could be that she’s on the remitting cycle in a mislabeled case of relapsing remitting MS. I’ve ridden on the high of those cycles, myself, exercising like a fiend on my borrowed time. I’m sorry to say those times don’t last. I wish her the best. Especially since, in six months, the Wahls diet may turn out to be the best option I’ll have left.
But why wait six months?
I’ve been eating aggressively healthy brain food ever since I first heard of the Wahls diet, but now I will start eating healthier still. (This prospect terrifies my husband, who claims I already eat healthier than anyone he knows)
I am perfectly willing to trade DAC HYP for eight daily platefuls of kale, if that would help me. I am perfectly willing to lift weights, swim laps, and practice yoga with twice the intensity of my normal schedule. Indeed, how could it hurt? I can foresee only one downside to this course of action. I know I am perfectly capable of blaming myself for not trying hard enough if—or let’s face it, when—the disease strikes again.
Would blaming myself be so healthy? I don’t think so.
A number of good people have approached me to ask what I “do” to remain so healthy with MS. I say I exercise, I say I eat well, I say I do yoga. They tell me I have a “good attitude.” They tell me others, those sicker with MS, do not. That may just be oversimplifying things.
Here’s the deal: I’ve had access to a good drug. Others with MS have not. In six months, I will join their ranks. We’ll see if a mix of a “good attitude”, a good workout routine and good diet will be enough to see me through until DAC HYP goes on the market. I’m sure it’s all very necessary. I can only hope it will be sufficient.